Factors that frustrates me with the industry


Factors that frustrates me with the industry

Consistency

 

One of the major factors that frustrates me with the industry is that there is little or no consistency with grading, rules and racing in general. Witch all could be solved with something called common sense.


Hot water policy

Rules like having water in the kennels differs from track to track and state to state. 

The hot weather policy is beneficial in practice, but lacks serious thought. 

Some dogs are nuts and don’t settle in kennels pre race, the issue here is they may knock themselves on the tin awkward buckets. Additionally some dogs drink little water pre race and others drink a lot. Surely the smart thing is to have water in the kennels after they race when they are less active but able to ensure they remain hydrated.

 

Barking muzzles

As a greyhound trainer it stands to reason you have to present your greyhound in peak condition each race.

For those dogs that are barkers the only way to ensure they arrive at the boxes in peak condition is to muzzle them to keep them calm. Surprise, surprise this rule is different state to state.

Why not nominate a greyhound as a ‘barker’, similar to a ‘bad box dog’, and once declared, stewards ensure the dog is always muzzled. This ensures the trainer, stewards and the punting public understand the greyhound that races last week is in a similar position to the one that races this week or in the following weeks. IT'S COMMON SENSE


Track surfaces

Around Australia it is surprising how little consistency there is in the sand based racing surfaces. There is no doubt some clubs get it right and others continue to produce inconsistent and unsuitable surfaces. If someone in governing body had some idea they would decide the best racing surface, the million dollar industry deserves to have that replicated state by state, even if it means importing sand from interstate. If the sand is right, then the only factor in deciding it’s racing surface is the curator who manages it. Once again, clubs and grounds that host important sporting events have to produce high standard surfaces so a multi million dollar industry like greyhound racing needs professionals paid well for producing safe and consistent racing surfaces. Greyhound owners, trainers and even the tractors should demand nothing less.

 

To ensure the future of racing it’s vital to ensure the well being of the racing greyhound and all these ideas are simple yet effective ways to achieve that by just using common sense.


Do you agree?

By Andrew Stollery